Molly, 33.
Cosplayer, library person, fashion enthusiast.
Fat, fabulous, occasionally charming and/or witty.

 

Anonymous asked
are all dogs dominant?

canidaemon:

perfectdogs:

No. 

A lot of people seem to think all dogs are trying to dominate you, and everyone, and need to be “alpha rolled” and treated harshly to keep them calm. That’s not how it works, or is. If you force your dog to do something and punish it (screaming, hitting…), then your dog will feel anxious and stressed. It’s not worth it.

Humans are trying to dominate dogs, really.

to add some things to this.

the dominance theory that is so prevalent is based on a single study done on wolves in the 70’s. no, not wild wolves, or even related wolves. a bunch of unrelated, unknown wolves thrown into a small paddock and fed with a deer corpse every so often. and these wolves did establish rigid social rankings based on the most violent/controlling individuals, using their dominance to control resources. the people in charge of the study decided this must be how all wolves form packs, and thus dog trainers decided that since dogs = wolves, this is how dogs form packs, and since this meshed so nicely with the correction-based methods of the time, it became wildly popular.

now, once we released wolves into yellowstone again, everyone and their cousin and their cousin’s brother wanted to study them. so we had a flood of data on actual wild wolves that completely debunked the study done on captive wolves. and honestly, it makes sense.

natural wolves form ‘packs’ that are just family groups, with the parents in charge and the children being taken care of by them. there may be siblings of the parents or other relatives in the pack as well, depending on how well they get along together. the children may stay too, depending on how well they get along with the parents. but usually, hormones drive up tensions between parents and children, and the children usually leave and form their own packs with other wolves who have ‘left the nest’.

dominance is simply who and how resources are controlled, and wolves often use very violent-looking ritualized displays, but they aren’t actually hurting one another. one actual fight with intent to harm will probably kill both wolves, because they will get wounded and then get infections that will probably kill them. and they know this, because lots of animals will main a prey animal then follow it until it succumbs to it’s wounds.

now, even the angle that wolves use violence to establish dominance, and that they have rank based on this, is debunked to an extent in wild wolves. wolves would much rather make space then hurt each other, which is why wolves have spread across the north america more then projected.

dogs, however, are not wolves. they’ve been their own species for tens of thousands of years, and are genetically, developmentally, physiological, and behaviorally different then wolves. just look at how different humans are from other apes. or horses and donkeys and zebra. etc.

dogs also fit into different niches then wolves. wolves are actively hunting large game. dogs evolved and did so well because they scavenged from humans and occasionally hunted things. dogs are not apex predators. dogs evolved and became domesticated because they aren’t wolves. wolves cannot be kept like dogs. there’s even thought that dogs aren’t descended from wolves, which is a whole other thing.

so, dogs basically started the domestication process. they were able to reproduce more sucessfully when they scavenged from humans, and humans probably killed the more violent dogs to protect themselves. dogs that were more social with humans and did not pose a danger to humans were able to reproduce. humans eventually started keeping them to hunt, to guard, and to eat. and boom. dogs as we know them are starting to appear.

dogs in the wild, so to speak, do not really form packs. they form loose social groupings around a resource, such as a trash dump. they won’t move as a huge pack to other places when the resource dries up, but may follow a dog [usually older and feeble] who knows where another resource is. basically, if you provide the food, the dog will believe you are a good dog to follow around to see if you might get food too.

of course, all of this applies to dog/dog relationships. animals don’t form social groups that are multi-species. dogs view people as people, not dogs. they aren’t looking to you as leader, they’re looking to you because you provide them with things they need to live, and are bred specifically for thousands of years to LOVE humans.

so basically. yeah.  if you’re dog is keeping a resource, it’s dominant. resource guarding is the only form of dominance-based aggression. there are no alphas, no omegas, even in wolves. no good breeder, trainer, or vet will reference a dog as dominant. science has come far in 40 years, there’s no excuse for ignorance.

Gah, telling someone that you like them is not easy.  It never is.  I would think that, after 33 years, it would be, but nope, still hard, still sucks, and still twists me up inside like a silly person.  Even when it ends up pretty good and the person saying that there’s potential interest, but they’re not sure where their head is, but they’re still very potentially interested in the future, I turn bright red and just lose the use of words entirely.

fattyforever:

curvily:

How often have you been shopping and you come across something that is just PERFECT, but does not go up to your size? Over 60% of American women wear a size 14 or above, but only 17% of clothing sold is 14 & up. That is a ridiculous disparity.
Moreover, when some brands move into plus (ahem H&M), they throw their signature trendy looks by the wayside in favor of flowy dark fabrics that they think “work” for plus sizes. That is crap. Plus size women want color, print, and structure. Moreover, we want variety. A group this numerous cannot be a monolith, and since style is such a personal thing, we all have different tastes. I want #plussizeplease to be a way to showcase the demand for styles we’d buy and rock, and all the money brands are forfeiting by refusing to expand their sizes.
So here’s how to use it:
1) Snap a picture of a garment you love but does not come in your size. Include the brand and price, tagging the company if possible. For example, I am in love with this Zara marble print dress. I would have purchased it yesterday if it went above a size L. My tweet would be:
“.@Zara marble print sheath, $59. I’d buy it right now if it came in my size. #plussizeplease”
2) Use it on any social media – Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest… even Facebook supports hashtags now.
3) Tag anything you’d purchase, whether in store or online.
4) Feel free to include the size range it comes in and/or the size you think you’d need. Sizing can be tricky, so this is definitely not required.
5) Tell your friends! I don’t just want this to be a blogger thing – I want all women who wear size 14 and up to show their purchasing power and share styles they love. Let’s be unignorable!

Um, yes. I will be doing this.

fattyforever:

curvily:

How often have you been shopping and you come across something that is just PERFECT, but does not go up to your size? Over 60% of American women wear a size 14 or above, but only 17% of clothing sold is 14 & up. That is a ridiculous disparity.

Moreover, when some brands move into plus (ahem H&M), they throw their signature trendy looks by the wayside in favor of flowy dark fabrics that they think “work” for plus sizes. That is crap. Plus size women want color, print, and structure. Moreover, we want variety. A group this numerous cannot be a monolith, and since style is such a personal thing, we all have different tastes. I want #plussizeplease to be a way to showcase the demand for styles we’d buy and rock, and all the money brands are forfeiting by refusing to expand their sizes.

So here’s how to use it:

1) Snap a picture of a garment you love but does not come in your size. Include the brand and price, tagging the company if possible. For example, I am in love with this Zara marble print dress. I would have purchased it yesterday if it went above a size L. My tweet would be:

“.@Zara marble print sheath, $59. I’d buy it right now if it came in my size. #plussizeplease”

2) Use it on any social media – Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest… even Facebook supports hashtags now.

3) Tag anything you’d purchase, whether in store or online.

4) Feel free to include the size range it comes in and/or the size you think you’d need. Sizing can be tricky, so this is definitely not required.

5) Tell your friends! I don’t just want this to be a blogger thing – I want all women who wear size 14 and up to show their purchasing power and share styles they love. Let’s be unignorable!

Um, yes. I will be doing this.

omniastudios:

Alright our lovely little witches, here is your chance to win some ghostly goodies from Omnia Oddities!
Win the following items:· One (1) “The Séance” sterling silver amulet   with natural moonstone on 24” sterling chain.· Two (2) Planchette Omnia logo tees in sizes   s - xxxl. (One for you, one for a friend you tag.  If you do not tag a friend only ONE shirt will be  awarded.)· One (1) “The Séance” clear resin bangle in size  small or standard.The Rules:· You must reblog and FOLLOW.· Do not delete the original text.· No giveaway only blogs.· Must be atleast 18 years old or have parent or   guardian’s permission to enter.· Tag a friend. (optional)Giveaway ends and winner chosen at random on: 04/21/14 @ 9pm EDT.
Contest is open to all, we ship world-wide. :)
Good Luck
www.omniaoddities.com

omniastudios:

Alright our lovely little witches, here is your chance to win some ghostly goodies from Omnia Oddities!

Win the following items:
· One (1) “The Séance” sterling silver amulet
  with natural moonstone on 24” sterling chain.
· Two (2) Planchette Omnia logo tees in sizes
  s - xxxl. (One for you, one for a friend you tag.
  If you do not tag a friend only ONE shirt will be
  awarded.)
· One (1) “The Séance” clear resin bangle in size
  small or standard.

The Rules:
· You must reblog and FOLLOW.
· Do not delete the original text.
· No giveaway only blogs.
· Must be atleast 18 years old or have parent or
  guardian’s permission to enter.
· Tag a friend. (optional)

Giveaway ends and winner chosen at random on:
04/21/14 @ 9pm EDT.

Contest is open to all, we ship world-wide. :)

Good Luck

www.omniaoddities.com

mitsory:

I promised a friend to pass him the link to this FanComic: Zhao, from the Water Tribe by Rufftoon. Now I recommend it to all of you. It’s well draw, well narrated, has a good story line,: It’s just EXELLENT.
Enjoy it!!
Oh! yeah… I guess you would want a synopsys…
This story happens in an Alternate Universe (AU) of Avatar, where Admiral Zhao didn’t die. The Ocean Spirit brought him back, but Zhao’s mind has been wiped clean. Now living amongst the Water Tribe, he’s managed to find a place in his adoptive nation. But his old personality is still there, and pretty soon, things change…
Read on!
It may start a bit slow, but I swear it does pick up :)

mitsory:

I promised a friend to pass him the link to this FanComic: Zhao, from the Water Tribe by Rufftoon. Now I recommend it to all of you. It’s well draw, well narrated, has a good story line,: It’s just EXELLENT.

Enjoy it!!

Oh! yeah… I guess you would want a synopsys…

This story happens in an Alternate Universe (AU) of Avatar, where Admiral Zhao didn’t die. The Ocean Spirit brought him back, but Zhao’s mind has been wiped clean. Now living amongst the Water Tribe, he’s managed to find a place in his adoptive nation. But his old personality is still there, and pretty soon, things change…

Read on!

It may start a bit slow, but I swear it does pick up :)

skeletorislove:

Skeletor Affirmations (by ghoulnextdoor)
"THE SKELETOR IN ME RECOGNIZES THE SKELETOR IN YOU."
Thanks to the folks at Pantheacon for this one :)

skeletorislove:

Skeletor Affirmations (by ghoulnextdoor)

"THE SKELETOR IN ME RECOGNIZES THE SKELETOR IN YOU."

Thanks to the folks at Pantheacon for this one :)

notacentaur:

roachpatrol:

coolchicksfromhistory:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

oh my gosh i want that stamped tee

oh shit i love those bags

thegreenwolf:

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population
A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.
Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading
Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.
Map observations
The map tends to highlight two types of areas:
places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.
Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.
Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.
At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.
Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.
Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.
In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.
Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.
::
Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.
I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?
Errata
The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
::
©mapsbynik 2014 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth Made with Tilemill USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

This is very cool.

thegreenwolf:

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

Map observations

The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

  • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
  • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

::

Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

Errata

  • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
  • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.

::

©mapsbynik 2014
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
Made with Tilemill
USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

This is very cool.